All posts filed under: Pitta

information, tips and recipes for pitta dosha inspired by Ayurveda

The Summer Cooler | minty, cucumber, aloe & lime elixir

On those summer days when no amount of water seems to quench the thirst, there’s nothing more satisfying than a refreshing, minty beverage. A glass filled with a little sweet, a little tangy, and a whole lot of cooling hydration. To rebalance the five elements, nourish the tissues, replenish electrolytes, and pacify pitta dosha. During a season where mineral depletion and heat accumulation are common imbalances, reaching for a cooling mineral-rich drink can recharge the system, while reducing internal heat. Summertime well-being has a lot to do with the balancing the water and fire elements in the body. Staying hydrated and cool are essential practices in cultivating a balanced pitta dosha. To sustain energy levels and prevent imbalances related to dryness and heat. In a season when the body is prone to rapidly lose water and minerals, dehydration is a common imbalance. Depleting the tissues of vital nutrients and moisture. Dryness in the body can also play a role in imbalances related to blood pressure levels, the flexibility of the joints, muscles, and be one …

The Summer Lover | a minty-rose, cardamom probiotic lassi

Summer wouldn’t be summer without a little fling. Sweet, intoxicating bliss, sparking the heart’s fire, sadhaka agni, with sattva—peaceful energy. A little wink, wink with an aphrodisiac infused with aromatic roses, mint, and cardamom. Then churned with a probiotic-rich yogurt to boost summers’ low digestive flame.  To tame the heated warrior spirit that arises from acidic heat stored in the gut, liver, and blood. In the summer season, when the element of fire is fierce, turn the wild passions of war into an elixir of love. Hello there…Summer Lover. Happy Drinking. Happy Digesting. 1/2 cup full-fat yogurt with whey (not greek) 1 1/2 cups water 1/2 tsp cardamom seeds or powder + a pinch a 1 finger pinch of Himalayan salt 2-3 fresh mint leaves 2 T rose water 2 T raw or coconut sugar* (or to taste) Decorative ingredients 1 T rose petals crushed + splash of rose water (optional) Getting fancy: to rim serving glasses with rose petals,  place crushed petals on to small plate/saucer. Coat the rim of the glass with rose water and dip …

Shredded Carrot & Lentil Salad

I think what I appreciate most about Indian/Pakistani salads is their similarity to a slaw.  They can be eaten as is,  a side, added to a wrap or the final topping on a bowl. Complimenting a meal or a bite, similar to a chutney or condiment. While retaining a hearty, crunchy freshness like a slaw. Since they last a few days in the fridge without wilting or losing the crunch factor, they can easily be made ahead. A handy convenience when time is of the essence. Salad-slaws can be a quick way to add a missing taste, quality or vegetable to a meal when applying Ayurveda food guidelines to eating.  Need a sweet, sour, astringent or bitter taste? Or something a little dry (aka crunchy) or light? Depending on the type of slaw, several missing bases can be covered at once. If I haven’t already said enough about why slaw-salads are awesome, here is one more thing. Slaw type salads aide and support digestion. A light fermentation process takes place from the salt and lemon or lime “dressing”.  Adding a …

Green Bean & Coconut Stir-Fry

Quick and easy with a flavorful aromatic punch pretty much sums up this string bean coconut stir-fry recipe from Chitra Agrawal’s new cookbook (read more here).  Any dish with shredded coconut always makes my eyes shine.  The chewy goodness sweetly balances the spicy flavor profile of this Karnatakan dish.  Adding a layer of complexity to a fairly simple dish.  The use of coconut is one of the things I appreciate most about cuisine from the Southern part of India. When I came across this recipe in Vibrant India, I knew it was one of the first ones I wanted to try.

Roasted Butternut Squash & Lentil Stew

The days when I craved butternut squash soup were long ago. A time when the sweetness did not overwhelm my taste buds and the heavy soup felt light.  An era I did not think would return.  Until I came across this Roasted Butternut Squash & Lentil Stew recipe in . A cookbook filled with Chitra Agarwal’s family’s recipes from the southern Indian state of Karnataka (click here to read my review). The combination of sweet and spicy ingredients immediately appealed to my current taste preference. Which is currently lingering between autumn and winter. When vata dosha is still center stage and kapha dosha begins to introduce itself.  A time when the grounding, earthy nourishment from the sweet taste is still integral to Ayurveda’s seasonal diet. While the pungent taste needs to take a step forward.  To counterbalance the start of the cold and wet season with its warming and drying qualities. A take on a traditional family recipe, Chitra, author of , blends butternut squash with red lentils.  Then spices it up with with a traditional …

Moong Daal in a Pot

Ghee-licious Moong Daal

Sometimes you’ve got to strip it all away and get down to the bare necessities. After six months of recipe testing, I was able to digest and implement this practice. Understanding that good food does not need to be complicated. The time and practice were well worth the experience.  Along with a ghee-licious recipe for moong daal, I love. You would think a girl who grew up eating daal every other week, could just whip up a  batch of soupy moong daal.  It would be easy breezy. Well…apparently, that wasn’t my case. Growing up moong daal was served like a dry curry. In which the integrity of the lentil remained. We ate this tomato based dish with chapati.  Sometimes rolled into a burrito. It was our road food. We also made other single soupy-style lentil recipes like tuwar and urad, but never moong. Hmmm—maybe it was a regional thing? I am not really sure of the why, but I do know there are a plethora daal recipes in South Asia. They vary from town to town, street to street, …

Peaches_Ghee_Coconut_Sprinkles

Caramelized Peaches with Cardamom-Coconut Sprinkles

What do you do when you pick up too many peaches? Carmalize them in ghee and sprinkle them with cardamom toasted coconut sprinkles, of course! White, yellow or donut shape, we’ll take one of each, please. Inspired by kela (bananas) ghee, a decadent weekend breakfast lovingly eaten with warm ghee’d up chapatis, we wanted to cook our peaches in a similar manner sans the chapatis. The end result was a keeper—perfect for breakfast, snack time or dessert. Not too heavy, nor too sweet, and with a little spice to make it extra nice. Happy Eating. Happy Digesting. 

Hibiscus-Rose Infusion for all Aphrodites

A magical infusion of hibiscus, rose, and cinnamon. It’s been several years since this intoxicating pinkish-red tonic touched my lips. Oh, how I missed it! This summer it returns. Exciting my eyes and tingling my nose. While cooling the body and mind from the fiery heat of the sun. Know for reducing excess heat from the body, hibiscus supports the first two chakras and balances feminine energy. In enhancing internal beauty is aids in producing an external glow. A gentle, detoxifying flower, hibiscus also evokes sattva—purity, harmony and balanced mental energy. A flower for all the goddesses, the Aphrodites. Here’s to embracing and balancing the divine feminine energy that births the population. Hibiscus through the lens of Ayurveda

Venus Water

I love turning what may seem like an ordinary moment into a spa-like experience. Whether it is taking a bath or drinking a glass of water. Evoking the senses with something out of the norm allows space for the ah-ha moment, the deep breath and appreciation. It’s a treat I wish I did more often, but there’s also something special about an occasional routine, I truly appreciate. Making water smell like roses will be one of my occasional summer routines. I am thinking of mixing up a weekly jug. To have on hand after a hike, on a lazy afternoon or just as a substitute for plain H20. It’s a cooling, nourishing option without the sugar that supports balancing pitta’s (fire + water) intense summer energy. If I feel like enhancing the sensorial experience, I’ll sprinkle in dried rose petals and fresh mint. In a few seconds (literally), the herbs transform my glass into a mini-edible garden and look so darling floating around. The bright green and pink attract a calming, yet vibrant energy. While bringing nature, …

Thyme for Coriander & Asparagus

I’ve been eating asparagus every week for the past 6 weeks and I am still loving it! With minimal prep and cook time, whether sauteed or steamed, these slightly sweet and astringent tasting spears are topping my spring list for the easiest green veggies. They’re so tasty too! Rich in the earth and air elements, foods with an astringent taste, like, asparagus, can bind and draw out excess from the body.  Whether it is ama (toxins derived from undigested food), fat or water, the astringent taste supports detoxification. Have you experienced urinating a bit more or longer after eating asparagus? In helping the body release excess water, combined with asparagus’ cooling energy, these delicious spears support reducing inflammation and puffiness, while helping to purify the blood. For individuals who tend to retain water or have accumulated excessive heat from the winter season, asparagus is spring’s natural detoxifier. It’s light and dry qualities harmonize with spring and prep the body for the summer. Mother Nature’s—she’s on it and one step ahead. Whether steamed or sautéed, the simpler the …

Zesty Fennel, Cucumber and Chive Salad

Over the past few years, fennel has a reserved spot my vegetable bin. Its versatility, carminative properties, and cooling energy has made it a weekly produce staple. When in season, I pick up a small to medium size bulb to incorporate half into a bitter-tart-sweet-slightly pungent juice, while using the stalk and fronds in homemade bone broths and the other half to roast with other seasonal veggies or shaved in a salad. From it’s seeds to flowers, fennel is used in many cultures around the globe. Commonly known as a digestive aid, fennel is cooling for the body. It is also a diuretic, helps with internal spasms and is considered a carminative herb. I wrote about the benefits of fennel if you would like to learn about it in more detail, click here. This week, I was craving a slaw-like salad. Something with a little crunch that felt cooling, was refreshing, with a touch of pungent and bitter tastes for balance and did not involve any lettuce. Apparently, all the ingredients also had to be green and white! I …

creamy-quinoa-khichadi

Creamy Quinoa Khichadi with Cumin Ghee

There’s something comforting about a rice and lentil porridge that just makes me holistically feel good.  I think Naram (creamy) Khichadi (khitch-ri) is infused within each of my cells. If a month goes by and they haven’t gotten a taste of some khichadi,they begin radiating signals and I begin to crave for it. If you’ve seen my Instagram posts, you know I make khichadi quite often. Per your requests—and thank you for the encouragement, I am posting the recipe for this down home dish with a slight twist today. I never thought the day would come when khichadi, would be requested by so many!  I think my nani (maternal grandmother) would be in shock if she knew that a dish she would dare not serve at a dinner party, is now loved across many cultures. Like daal (lentil soup), the are several khichadi variations. However, the base is always moong daal and a grain—traditionally, basmati rice. Naram Khichadi or just Khichadi as we refer to it in our home, is similar to Bhuni Khichadi. It is soft, moist and easy on the digestion. The …

5 Spices w/Yams & Rainbow Chard #chitchaatchai

5 Spiced Yams & Rainbow Chard

I love leveraging a good, basic recipe and adjusting a few ingredients to change up the flavor. It makes cooking easier, leaves room for a little creativity and keeps meals fresh—who doesn’t want that?! Today’s recipe, is based on a recipe I posted awhile back that was intentionally developed to be flexible—5 Spices & a Veggie, a Quick ‘Ayurvedic’ Stir-Fry.  Using the same simple concept to create today’s recipe. I chose veggies and spices based on the tastes and qualities that are complimentary to the summer aka pitta season. The main ingredients—yams (sweet), red onions (sweet when caramelized) and rainbow chard (astringent and bitter) make up the 3 key tastes of summer according to Ayurveda’s wisdom.  A sprinkle of five spices (technically six with the lemon-oops!) provide the remaining three tastes—pungent, sour and salty. Ayurveda speaks to the importance of incorporating all six tastes in every dish and/or meal to ensure the body, mind, emotions and spirit get the essential nutrients and nourishment. This helps with retaining balance and reduces cravings.

5 Spices & a Veggie, an 'Ayurvedic' Stir-Fry

5 Spices & a Veggie: a Quick ‘Ayurvedic’ Stir-Fry

One of the best things for strengthening the digestive track is to—spice it up! Spices (and this includes herbs) are like digestive aides. They support the digestion of food from the time it enters the body to the time it exits. Rich in vitamins and minerals, spices prevent toxins from accumulating in the gut.  In-turn, allowing for better absorption and fostering good health. Eating healthy is not just about organic, fresh and local vegetables, good fats, and whole grains.  It also considers if the food can be easily digested.  Spices can be intimidating, at first.  The variety of spices alone can make it challenging to figure out which ones to buy.  I recommend starting with a 4-5 dry spices. A few different spices is all you need to get the party started.  Then, it’s having fun experimenting with different combinations, adjusting the quantity, or  when to incorporate them into the pot. Even with just a few of the same spices, making these types of adjustments can change a dishes flavor. My recipe below will help you get started on your spice journey. It is a tri-doshic recipe, meaning …

Lavender-Rose Blueberry Jam

Nearly a decade ago, I made my first spiced jam—blueberry with black pepper. The sprinkling of freshly cracked pepper on buttered toast had tickled my fancy for quite some time. Adding a few twists of this heating spice to homemade jam that was likely going to spread across crunchy, fermented sourdough, slathered in coconut mana or ghee seemed like a wise choice. Tickled are the taste buds. Nourished are the emotions. Satisfied is the spirit. With a little spice. So, why not a little spiced up ja Spices have been a part of my life since before my memories begin. One could say they’re part of my DNA. A lingering character that has melded into my life story.  A constant presence, spices filled the pantry even when the fridge was empty. When their presence became known, our relationship sparked. It began with learning their names. The process took a little time as unlabeled jars created some challenges along with way. Eventually, their English and Urdu/Hindi embedded themselves into my muscle memory. Soon after, I began to …

Aam Ka Raas aka Mango Soup @chit.chaat.chai

Aam ka Raas aka Mango Juice

It’s mango, mango, mango time.  Big, juicy varietals like Tommy, Kent and Haden are in peak season. Ready to be devoured straight off the skin like an artichoke and into my belly. Mango juice dripping down the sides of the mouth, hands getting stickier with every bite—tie your hair back because there’s nothing like the first mango of the summer! Mangos are not just any ol’ summer time fruit—they are an event.  Uprooting nostalgic sensations that ignite all of my five senses. Upon seeing, touching, smelling and eating a mango, I tumble down the rabbit hole hearing ancestral voices echoing pleasure.